Since the launch of Project: Report, aspiring journalists from around the world have produced video reports on issues not covered by the traditional media. Voting for Round 2 is complete, and the panel of journalists from the Pulitzer Center is in the process of tallying the final counts. Tomorrow, we will announce which five of the 10 semi-finalists will advance to the final round of competition and get one step closer to the $10,000 journalism fellowship to report on a story abroad.













Tomorrow, these five finalists begin their work on the third and final assignment: produce a piece of collaborative storytelling that empowers an underrepresented community to share its own story with the world. First, choose a group of people rarely covered by the traditional media. Then, let them use the camera to document their own lives.




The video must be five minutes or less. All entries must be submitted in English or have English subtitles. For those of you who were not selected as finalists, you can still complete the Round 3 assignment to compete for additional technology prizes from Sony Vaio and Intel.




If you're looking for some examples, take a look at this video from Pulitzer Center journalist Andre Lambertson on child soldiers in Liberia. He also offers tips for how to produce a piece of collaborative storytelling.




All accepted entries will be reviewed by a panel of journalists from the Pulitzer Center and judged based on the depth of the reporting, the clarity of the narrative, and the power of the story. The videos from the five finalists will also be voted on by the YouTube community.




Though only five reporters will move on to the final round, all ten of the semi-finalists produced impressive work, and in today's homepage takeover, we feature the videos they submitted in Round 2, each of which tells a story unfolding in a local community that touches on global themes and issues.




We hope you enjoy!




Yours,

Olivia M.

YouTube News & Politics